At-a-Glance Dates

WORKSHOPS: (BOSTON)  

MI Skills Development
Fri 11/14/08, 8:30-3:30
 

MI Brief Interventions
Fri 1/16/08, 8:30-3:30
 

MI for Dietary Behavior Change
Fri-Sat, 10/17-10/18/08
 

MI Comprehensive First Course
Fri-Sat, 10/31-11/1/08
Fri-Sat, 2/13-2/14/09   

MI & Kids 2
Fri 12/5/08, 8:30-3:30
 

MI & Health Behavior Change
Mon 12/1/08, 9:00-4:00
 
 

WEBINARS: (EST)    

MI: Brief Interventions
Wed 8/13/08,1:00-2:30 Mon 9/8/08,2:00-3:30
Mon 10/13/08,2:00-3:30
 
Mon 11/17/08,1:00-2:30 

MI with Kids & Parents
Wed 8/27/08, 1:00-2:30 Mon 9/22/08, 1:00-2:30 Mon 11/3/08, 1:00-2:30 Mon 12/8/08, 1:00-2:30 

MI & Addictive Disorders
Thu 9/11/08, 1:00-2:30 Mon 11/10/08, 1:00-2:30  
What is MI?
Wed 9/17/08, 1:00-2:30
 

MI and the Non-Diet Approach
Thu 10/2/08 12:00-1:30 

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Register

Visit our Website:
www.miinstitute.com 

Contact us:
 

Institute for Motivation and Change

229 Billerica Road

Chelmsford, MA 01824

Tel: 781-890-1618 


 

Gary Rose, Ph.D.
Ellen Glovsky, Ph.D., RD, LDN
 
Motivational Interviewing is a powerful, evidence-based consultation style with applications to the many sub-fields of health behavior change, including addictions treatment, chronic disease management, diet and nutrition, diabetes education, cardiac rehabilitation, and many other health-care challenges. Learn how MI techniques can improve your patients' outcomes and enhance your practice.
MI: The Patient-Centered Relationship
Gary Rose, Ph.D.

  

Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based approach to health behavior change counseling. Being both patient-centered and directive, MI brings a fundamental shift to the consultative relationship -- the practitioner is more guide than director. This stylistic shift springs from two observations: one, a growing understanding of ambivalence as a powerful and central force in health behavior change conversations; and two, recognition that over-relying on the traditional directing/educative style can actually decrease a patient's readiness to change.

MI uses both relational and technical components. The relational components operationalize the patient-centered core of MI and serve as a foundation for the technical, directive features of this interview style. The acronym RULE (Rollnick, Miller & Butler, 2008) captures the essence of the MI relationship: Resist the Righting Reflex; Understand patient motivation; Listen well; Empower. Let's look at each element in turn:

Resist the Righting Reflex: The righting reflex (Miller & Rollnick, 2002) refers to the practitioner's impulse to use information and persuasion to increase a patient's motivation to change. Direct persuasion is indeed an effective motivational tool in the absence of ambivalence, and when the patient already presents with a high degree of readiness. In these circumstances, direct persuasion serves as an effective "final push."

However, when used with less motivated and more ambivalent patients, the educative/persuasive technique often backfires. A patient's autonomy is threatened, and he starts to defend his right to sustain the typically higher risk lifestyle. The resulting verbal volley often resembles a college debate, with point matched by counterpoint ad nauseam -- an 'argument' practitioners rarely win.

The MI practitioner resists the righting reflex by expressing a keen interest in the patient's point of view. Through reflective listening, the practitioner demonstrates an understanding of both sides of the change/don't change dilemma and asks key questions inviting the patient to voice the argument for change.


Understand Motivation: Traditional health educational methods presume that patients will voluntarily pursue healthiness when they clearly understand that their health is at risk or already impaired. Unfortunately, most of the time this simply is not true. Improving health typically does not rise to priority one until the patient faces an acute and omnipresent danger.

For most patients, health is a means to an end -- something that allows them to gain or sustain a non-health goal. Examples abound in clinical practice. For instance, the teenager who joins a health club and cuts calories to become a better wrestler; the college student who quits smoking to be an attractive smoocher; and the renal patient who controls fluid intake to have the post-dialysis energy to enjoy her grandchildren are all examples of patients whose positive health behavior delivers a personal goal tied to their life context and not their body, per se.

The MI practitioner demonstrates a keen interest in the patient's life context, personal values, and core beliefs; and he uses this knowledge to create a motivational bridge to health maintenance and lifestyle change.

Listen Well:  Reflective listening is the principal component of the MI guiding style. Accurate empathy develops around a structure of reflective listening, and it serves to both support the patient and to guide his awareness toward the benefits of health behavior change. 

Empower:  Lifestyle changes entail both initiating and maintaining change. The empowered patient will more likely sustain changes that involve sacrificing short-term comfort and convenience for long-term health risk reduction. MI practitioners empower patients by offering options, not unsolicited advice, and by maintaining a balance of power in the consultative relationship.

Considerable evidence shows that practitioners who adhere to RULE have patients who are more engaged in treatment and more likely to change. RULE creates a foundation on which to place the technical components of MI: the interview strategies which elicit and reinforce change talk, and the client utterances that signal an interest in and commitment to behavioral change. Next month we'll investigate the nuts and bolts of change talk.

Copyright 2008, all rights reserved.

We hope you will be able to attend one of our workshops or webinars to hear more about these ideas and begin using them in your own practice!

 
 
WORKSHOPS
Join us at Northeastern University for hands-on training.
 

MI: A Skills Development Workshop - 1 Day, $225
MI: Brief Interventions - 1 Day, $200
MI for Dietary Behavior Change - 1.5 Days, $325
MI: A Comprehensive First Course - 2 Days, $375
MI & Kids 2 - 1 Day, $200
 
MI & Health Behavior Change - 1 Day, $190   
 
Motivational Interviewing: A Skills Development Workshop
Gary Rose, Ph.D.


Practitioners from a wide range of settings face the challenge of encouraging patients to consider behavior change – in diet, smoking, taking medicines, exercise and drinking. It is often a frustrating encounter. This workshop provides an opportunity for practitioners who have already been utilizing the skills and techniques of Motivational Interviewing to:
  • Learn about recent advances in models, concepts and skills for conducting constructive consultations about behavior change.
  • Develop advanced competencies in selective reflection and eliciting change talk.
  • Practice coding MI sessions for the purposes of supervision and skills development.
  • Address the application of Motivational Interviewing to special populations (to be determined by the needs of the enrollees).
Open to all practitioners who have completed a basic workshop in MI and are interested in continuing to develop their skillfulness in MI. This is an intensive 1-day workshop limited to 16 participants. The workshop meets on Friday, 11/14/08 from 8:30am-3:30pm (6 contact hours).


Motivational Interviewing: Brief Interventions

Gary Rose, Ph.D.


Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an effective, evidence based consultation style for practitioners working with clients and patients regarding health behavior change. The challenges of this work are numerous, from initial engagement through treatment planning and maintenance of change. Direct persuasion and other traditional methods of health education are often ineffective. This is particularly true when the opportunities to talk with patients about change are limited to a few brief moments of opportunistic conversation.

This workshop will address the applications of MI to health behavior change, with particular focus on briefer conversations about change. Building on the basics of MI, we will discuss and practice more advanced MI skills and techniques, including strategies for collaborative health education and treatment negotiation. There will be also be opportunities to design brief interventions pertinent to your adult or pediatric clinical practice. Although we will focus on health behavior change in general, we will also address in particular issues related to working with patients and their families regarding weight management, diabetes, smoking, and the management of chronic diseases.

Open to all practitioners in healthcare settings who have completed a basic introductory workshop and are interested in continuing to develop their skillfulness in MI. This 1-day workshop is limited to 24 participants.
The workshop will meet on Friday, 1/16/08 from 8:30am-3:30pm (6 contact hours).

MI for Dietary Behavior Change

Ellen Glovsky, Ph.D., RD, LDN
.

This 1.5-day workshop is designed specifically for dietitians, nutritionists, and others whose work entails helping people to change their behavior with food.

The workshop will provide a basic introduction to Motivational Interviewing, introducing the philosophy of MI, the microskills necessary for bringing this “spirit” into the consultation room, and various techniques that can be integrated into everyday professional practice. Teaching methods will include lecture, discussion, role play and “real play”, as well as viewing video clips that demonstrate MI techniques.

This workshop will be beneficial both to those with no prior MI experience as well as to those who wish to renew their understanding of MI. The workshop meets on Friday, 10/17/08 from 9:00am-4:00pm and Saturday, 10/18/08 from 8:30am-12:30pm (10 contact hours). A light breakfast will be provided.

MI: A Comprehensive First Course
Gary Rose, Ph.D.


This 2-day workshop will provide a comprehensive introduction to Motivational Interviewing. We will introduce the philosophy of MI, the microskills necessary for bringing this “spirit” into the consultation room, and various techniques that can be integrated into everyday professional practice.

The workshop is well-suited to the needs of practitioners whose daily work entails conversations with patients and clients about health behavior change. Open to all professionals in health care, social services, and criminal justice settings, the workshop will be beneficial both to those with no prior MI experience as well as those who wish to renew their understanding of MI. We will address the needs of both those who work with adults as well as children and families.

This is an intensive 2-day workshop for individuals interested in achieving basic competence in the application of MI to their work. The workshop is limited to 24 participants and meets on Friday, 10/31/08 from 8:30-3:00pm and Saturday, 11/1/08 from 8:30am-3:00pm (11 contact hours). The class will also be held on Friday, 2/13/09 and Saturday, 2/14/09 (same hours).
 
MI and Kids 2
Gary Rose, Ph.D.


During the last ten years, there has also been marked interest in the applications of the MI consultation style to work with adolescents, children, and their families. MI for kids and adolescents has addressed a variety of problems and concerns, including adolescent smoking and substance misuse, school noncompliance, childhood obesity, unsafe sexual practices, and general child-parent conflict.

This workshop will provide an opportunity for continued skills development for practitioners who have already completed an introductory MI workshop or its equivalent. We will provide opportunities to develop advanced competencies in selective reflection and the elicitation of change talk as well as to focus on the unique features of MI as applied to work with children, adolescents, and their caregivers. Adaptations of Mi to opportunistic and non-traditional settings will also be discussed.

This is a 1-day workshop on Friday, December 5th, from 8:30am-3:30pm. The workshop is limited to 24 participants.

Motivational Interviewing & Health Behavior Change
Ellen Glovsky, Ph.D., RD, LDN
.

MI is a person-centered, directive style of consultation that uses empathy, empowerment, and the skillful use of directive listening to guide the client toward change. This workshop will provide a basic introduction to Motivational Interviewing. We will introduce the philosophy of MI, the microskills necessary for bringing this “spirit” into the consultation room, and various techniques that can be integrated into everyday professional practice.

The workshop is well-suited to the needs of practitioners whose daily work entails conversations with patients and clients about health behavior change. Open to all professionals in health care, social services, and criminal justice settings, the workshop will be beneficial both to those with no prior MI experience as well as to those who wish to renew their understanding of MI.

This 1-day workshop meets from 9:00am-4:00pm (6 contact hours) on Monday, December 1, 2008, and includes morning coffee, tea and a light breakfast. The workshop is limited to 25 participants. Click here for information on CEUS.
 
 
WEBINARS
Join us from the comfort of your own home or office. 
The following webinars are $75 each. 

 

What is MI?
Ellen Glovsky, Ph.D., RD, LDN

This webinar will introduce the philosophy (“spirit”) and techniques of Motivational Interviewing (MI), an evidenced-based consultation style with applications to the many sub-fields of health behavior change, including addictions treatment, chronic disease management, diet and nutrition, diabetes education, and cardiac rehabilitation, to name but a few. We will discuss the concepts of the “righting reflex,” change talk, and the decisional matrix, three core components of the MI guiding style. This webinar is ideal for professionals who are wondering if MI might be a helpful strategy for their clinical practices. Click here for information on CEUS.

MI and Addictive Disorders

Gary Rose, Ph.D.

Motivational Interviewing was developed 25 years ago as an alternative to the standard directive, educational approach to the treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders. Since then, MI has become the standard of treatment across most of the world.

This webinar will provide a general introduction to the principles and practices of MI as applied to addictive disorders. We will pay particular attention to the recent research on the effectiveness of MI in combination with other treatments, and the interfacing of MI with harm reduction interventions.

MI with Kids and Parents
Gary Rose, Ph.D.

This webinar will provide a general introduction to the philosophy, science, and techniques of Motivational Interviewing, with particular focus on the needs of professionals who deal with children, adolescents, and their parents. We will discuss the concepts of the “righting reflex,” change talk, and the decisional matrix, three core components of the MI guiding style. The webinar will provide a valuable learning experience both for practitioners who have no prior knowledge of MI, as well as for those who have been briefly introduced to the model.
 
MI: Brief Interventions
Gary Rose, Ph.D.

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an effective, evidence based consultation style for practitioners working with clients and patients regarding health behavior change. The challenges of this work are numerous, from initial engagement through treatment planning and maintenance of change. Direct persuasion and other traditional methods of health education are often ineffective. This is particularly true when the opportunities to talk with patients about change are limited to a few brief moments of opportunistic conversation.

This intermediate webinar will address the applications of MI to health behavior change, with particular focus on briefer conversations about change. Building on the basics of MI, we will discuss the modification of MI techniques to fit the time-limited consultation.

Open to all practitioners in healthcare settings who had a basic exposure to MI, either through a previous training experience or through reading an MI textbook.


MI and the "Non-Diet" Approach to Dietary Behavior Change
Ellen Glovsky, Ph.D., RD, LDN


Motivational Interviewing skills are especially useful in teaching a “non-diet” approach to dietary behavior change. This non-diet approach teaches hunger and fullness awareness, food choice based on what one really wants to eat, and conscious eating. The method takes into account special dietary needs as well as a healthy diet for disease prevention.

This webinar will discuss the basics of Motivational Interviewing and its application to the “non-diet” method. We will discuss the philosophy (“spirit”) and techniques of Motivational Interviewing, as well as the concepts of the “righting reflex,” change talk, and the decisional matrix, three core components of the MI guiding style. This webinar is appropriate for any health care provider who works with clients/patients regarding dietary behavior change.


Click here for information on CEUS.